Tech Today w/ Ken May

Archive for September 10th, 2017

Rare translucent ‘ghost’ lobster caught by Maine lobsterman

Posted by kenmay on September - 10 - 2017

After more than 40 years on the job, 10th generation lobsterman Alex Todd of Chebeague Island, Maine recently pulled in a crustacean even he had never seen: a translucent lobster. He’s quoted in the Guardian as saying , “I was definitely surprised,” and “It was like it was clear but with white under the clearness and a blue tint, but you couldn’t see organs or anything under the shell, it wasn’t to that level.” The Maine Coast Fishermen’s Association shared a little info about the lobster’s unusual pearly look, on their Facebook page: A normal lobster gets its color by mixing yellow, blue, and red protein pigments. Through different genetic mutations you can get a blue, yellow, or red (uncooked) lobster. You can also get strange mixtures of those colors as well. This lobster probably has a genetic condition called Leucism which isn’t a total loss of pigment (which would make it an albino) but instead a partial loss. This is why you can still see some hints of blue on the shell and color on the eyes. Todd threw the lobster back into the ocean because it is an egg-bearing female . Such lobsters are protected under strict conservation laws.

Categories: reader

An anonymous reader quotes security researcher Brian Krebs: The web site that Equifax advertised as the place where concerned Americans could go to find out whether they were impacted by this breach — equifaxsecurity2017.com — is completely broken at best, and little more than a stalling tactic or sham at worst. In the early hours after the breach announcement, the site was being flagged by various browsers as a phishing threat. In some cases, people visiting the site were told they were not affected, only to find they received a different answer when they checked the site with the same information on their mobile phones. TechCrunch has concluded that “the checker site, hosted by Equifax product TrustID, seems to be telling people at random they may have been affected by the data breach.” One user reports that entering the same information twice produced two different answers. And ZDNet’s security editor reports that even if you just enter Test or 123456, “it says your data has been breached.” TechCrunch writes: The assignment seems random. But, nevertheless, they were still asked to continue enrolling in TrustID. What this means is not only are none of the last names tied to your Social Security number, but there’s no way to tell if you were really impacted. It’s clear Equifax’s goal isn’t to protect the consumer or bring them vital information. It’s to get you to sign up for its revenue-generating product TrustID. Meanwhile, one web engineer claims the secret 10-digit “security freeze” PIN being issued by Equifax “is just a timestamp of when you made the freeze.” Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader

An Intelligent Speed Bump Uses Non-Newtonian Liquid

Posted by kenmay on September - 10 - 2017

turkeydance quotes Business Insider: A Spanish company has designed a speed bump that won’t hinder slow drivers but will still stop motorists driving too fast. The speed bump is filled with a non-Newtonian liquid which changes viscosity when pressure is applied at high velocity. They’ve been installed in Villanueva de Tapia, Spain and there has also been interest from Israel and Germany. There’s a video on the site showing the speed bump in action. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader