Tech Today w/ Ken May

Archive for September 16th, 2017

schwit1 shares a report from ScienceAlert: The brain-dwelling parasite Toxoplasma gondii is estimated to be hosted by at least 2 billion people around the world, and new evidence suggests the lodger could be more dangerous than we think. While the protozoan invader poses the greatest risk to developing fetuses infected in the womb, new research suggests the parasite could alter and amplify a range of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s, and also cancer. “This study is a paradigm shifter, ” says one of the team, neuroscientist Dennis Steindler from Tufts University. “We now have to insert infectious disease into the equation of neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, and neural cancers.” The findings are part of an emerging field of research looking into how T. gondii, which is usually transmitted to humans via contact with cat faeces (or by eating uncooked meat), produces proteins that alter and manipulate the brain chemistry of their infected hosts. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader

Susan Mauldin, the person in charge of the Equifax’s data security, has a bachelor’s degree and a master of fine arts degree in music composition from the University of Georgia, according to her LinkedIn profile. Mauldin’s LinkedIn profile lists no education related to technology or security. If that wasn’t enough, news outlet MarketWatch reported on Friday that Susan Mauldin’s LinkedIn page was made private and her last name was replaced with “M”, in a move that appears to keep her education background secret. Earlier this month Equifax, which is one of the three major consumer credit reporting agencies, said that hackers had gained access to company data that potentially compromised sensitive information for 143 million American consumers, including Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers. On Friday, the UK arm of the organisation said files containing information on “fewer than 400, 000” UK consumers was accessed in the breach. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader

A number of HP device owners are complaining of seeing black screens for around five to 10 minutes after entering their Windows login information. From a report: They appear to be pointing the finger of blame at Windows 10 updates released September 12 for x64-based systems. One, a quality update called KB4038788, offered a whopping 27 bullet points for general quality improvements and patches, such as an “issue that sometimes causes Windows File Explorer to stop responding and causes the system to stop working.” Another, KB4038806, was a “critical” patch for Adobe Flash Player that allowed remote code execution. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Verizon is disconnecting another 8, 500 rural customers from its wireless network, saying that roaming charges have made certain customer accounts unprofitable for the carrier. The 8, 500 customers have 19, 000 lines and live in 13 states (Alaska, Idaho, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wisconsin), a Verizon Wireless spokesperson told Ars today. They received notices of disconnection this month and will lose access to Verizon service on October 17. Verizon said in June that it was only disconnecting “a small group of customers” who were “using vast amounts of data — some as much as a terabyte or more a month — outside of our network footprint.” But one customer, who contacted Ars this week about being disconnected, said her family never used more than 50GB of data across four lines despite having an “unlimited” data plan. We asked Verizon whether 50GB a month is a normal cut-off point in its disconnections of rural customers, but the company did not provide a specific answer. “These customers live outside of areas where Verizon operates our own network, ” Verizon said. “Many of the affected consumer lines use a substantial amount of data while roaming on other providers’ networks and the roaming costs generated by these lines exceed what these consumers pay us each month. We sent these notices in advance so customers have plenty of time to choose another wireless provider.” Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader

Mystery of Sonic Weapon Attacks At US Embassy In Cuba Deepens

Posted by kenmay on September - 16 - 2017

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: The blaring, grinding noise jolted the American diplomat from his bed in a Havana hotel. He moved just a few feet, and there was silence. He climbed back into bed. Inexplicably, the agonizing sound hit him again. It was as if he’d walked through some invisible wall cutting straight through his room. Soon came the hearing loss, and the speech problems, symptoms both similar and altogether different from others among at least 21 U.S. victims in an astonishing international mystery still unfolding in Cuba. The top U.S. diplomat has called them “health attacks.” New details learned by the Associated Press indicate at least some of the incidents were confined to specific rooms or even parts of rooms with laser-like specificity, baffling U.S. officials who say the facts and the physics don’t add up. Suspicion initially focused on a sonic weapon, and on the Cubans. Yet the diagnosis of mild brain injury, considered unlikely to result from sound, has confounded the FBI, the state department and U.S. intelligence agencies involved in the investigation. Some victims now have problems concentrating or recalling specific words, several officials said, the latest signs of more serious damage than the U.S. government initially realized. The United States first acknowledged the attacks in August — nine months after symptoms were first reported. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: reader