Murrine Core: Loren Stump’s Sliced Glass ‘Paintings’ Mark the Intersection of Art and Craft

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Reportedly developed some four millenia ago and revived by Italian artisans in the 16th Century, murrine is among those crafts that long predates the much-ballyhooed contemporary craft movement. Yet artist Loren Stump has found a way to breathe new life into the age-old glass design technique, in which canes of glass are fused (in parallel) and sliced to reveal intricately patterned sections. (Picture a Swiss cake roll, or that bakeable play-dough that could be mashed together and sliced to similar effect.) As with Takayo Kiyota’s sushi art , Stump works backward from a two-dimensional image, extruding the picture plane to extrapolate am arrangement of colored rods. Apparently he likes a challenge, considering he tends to to take on extremely detailed historical images like Da Vinci’s Virgin on the Rocks (seen above) and Henry VIII. He also does commissioned pieces, if you’ve got any special requests. Stump started out as a stained glass artist and eventually made the switch to working with molten varieties and creating his own process and tools—including a mysterious vacuum-controlled apparatus called the Stumpsucker . (more…)

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Murrine Core: Loren Stump’s Sliced Glass ‘Paintings’ Mark the Intersection of Art and Craft

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