You’re An Adult, But Your Brain Might Not Be, Researchers Say

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“The human brain reaches its adult volume by age 10, but the neurons that make it up continue to change for years after that, ” reports the New York Times, citing a new paper by neuroscience researchers that questions when “adulthood” really begins. An anonymous reader writes: One of the paper’s authors — an associate psychology professor at Harvard — tells CNN that “There is no agreed-on benchmark that, when reached, would allow a neuroscientist to say ‘Aha! This brain is fully developed’. However, it is safe to say that by almost any metric, the brain is continuing to develop actively well past the age of 18…” “Some children, researchers have found, have neural networks that look as if they belong to an adult…” adds the Times, noting that adolescents also “do about as well as adults on cognition tests, for instance. But if they’re feeling strong emotions, those scores can plummet. The problem seems to be that teenagers have not yet developed a strong brain system that keeps emotions under control.” And this cuts both ways, according to a psychologist at Temple University who wants the voting age lowered to 16. (“Sixteen-year-olds are just as good at logical reasoning as older people are, ” he tells the Times) But he also believes judges should consider the lack of emotional control when sentencing defendants — even if they’re in their early 20s. “Most crime situations that young people are involved in are emotionally arousing situations — they’re scared, or they’re angry, intoxicated or whatever.” Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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You’re An Adult, But Your Brain Might Not Be, Researchers Say

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