Tech Today w/ Ken May

Archive for July 13th, 2017

How to super clean your vehicle’s engine bay

Posted by kenmay on July - 13 - 2017

Whenever I’ve gone to a vintage car show, I’ve often wondered how they get their engines so sparkling clean. Now I know! This comprehensive how-to video from YouTuber ChrisFix shows exactly how to wash, and then detail, your vehicle’s engine bay. It takes about two hours, from start to finish, to get your engine super-shiny clean. I think his “before and after” engine bay photos are particularly satisfying. Note to self: Keep this video handy for your post-Burning Man engine-cleaning needs. ( digg )

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Later this year, AT&T’s launching an ambitious plan to revamp and unify its disparate video services. In a move that chief marketing officer David Christopher called “going from a hardware-centric model to a software-centric model.” Similar to Comcast’s X1 platform launch a few years ago , the plan is to have a single base for how its video services — whether internet-served like DirecTV Now , satellite-provided DirecTV , U-verse IPTV or NFL Sunday Ticket — look and feel across every device. Where AT&T pushes things further is that it already offers a national internet TV platform, and that’s where customers will see the new technology first when beta tests start later this year. AT&T executive VP & CTO Enrique Rodriguez spoke to Engadget about the rollout, saying that “if you look at the work we’ve done on DirecTV Now, it’s been very successful on Apple TV and so you can think of this as a continuation of that transition.” Invited DirecTV Now customers will be the first ones using the new technology, as shown above running on iOS, when the beta testing starts ahead of a rollout across more services and hardware over the “coming years.” The next-generation platform will bring everything we’ve seen from modernized TV setups over the last few years, with recommendations and profiles, backed by all the content AT&T/DirecTV provides subscribers. When the beta starts, there will be a cloud DVR feature and other new features already up and running. Features on deck for later this year include live TV pausing and parental controls, while other key elements like profiles, download-and-go and 4K Ultra HD with HDR are scheduled to launch in 2018. It won’t come all at once, but AT&T is turning its various video services, both “monolithic” as Christopher called them, and streaming into something built for the modern era. So far, the rollout of DirecTV Now has weathered some glitches and criticism that it hasn’t offered much new . But now that it’s had some time to roll out and expand its content offerings , the time is right for an upgrade. A frustrating aspect of the TV business since the dawn of high definition has been the slow pace of upgrades — digital TV, DVR, video-on-demand, internet streaming and cloud recordings have taken so many years to roll out — but maybe this transition can pull everything together. Of course, since AT&T owns so many pathways to customers including wireless, it has more incentive to push new technology, as reports suggested it expects to have a primarily streaming video service within the next few years. Source: AT&T

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Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) The Asus ROG GX800VH, a liquid cooled monstrosity of a gaming laptop, is one of those things that, like 4K phones or the Apple Watch , is wholly unnecessary yet awfully desirable. Beneath its fully mechanical, RBG-lit keyboard is Intel’s top-of-the-line mobile i7-7820HK processor, which is based on the same Kaby Lake architecture as the  i7-7700K  and is similarly overclockable. There are two Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics cards paired in SLI, 64GB of DDR4 memory, and an 18.4-inch 4K display with G-Sync. Buying one costs £6,600 /$6,300, which is an astonishing amount of money even considering the tech that’s included. Specs at a glance: Asus ROG GX800VH Screen 3840×2160 18.4-inch IPS G-Sync display 100 percent RGB OS Windows 10 Home x64 CPU 4C/8T 2.9GHz Core i7-7820HK (OC to 4.4GHz) RAM 64GB 2800MHz DDR4 GPU 2x Nvidia GTX 1080 HDD 2x 512GB NVMe SSD in RAID 0 Networking 802.11ac WiFi, Bluetooth 4.1, Gigabit Ethernet Ports 1 x Microphone-in jack 1 x Headphone-out jack (SPDIF) 1 x Type C USB3.1 (GEN2) Thunderbolt 3 x Type A USB3.0 (USB3.1 GEN1) 1 x RJ45 LAN Jack for LAN insert 1 x HDMI 1 x Docking port (HOT swap) 1 x mini Display Port 1 x SD card reader Size Laptop: 45.8 x 33.8 x 4.54 cm (WxDxH) Dock: (Thermal Dock) 35.9 x 41.8 x 13.3 cm (WxDxH) Other perks 8 Cells 71 Whrs Battery, HD Web Camera, Mechanical Keyboard Warranty 1 year Price £6,600 /$6,300 The GX800VH certainly isn’t for everyone, then, not least those that want the most bang-for-the-buck. But as an example of what’s possible on the bleeding edge when money is no object, it’s one of the finest pieces of technological willy-waving that we’ve ever seen. Buying a GX800VH requires a commitment from both your credit card and your ego. Not only is the laptop itself physically large and covered in orange highlights, but it comes with both a backpack and a suitcase to carry the accompanying liquid cooling unit around—and the graphics on the suitcase are hardly what you’d call subtle. Still, the suitcase—which is filled a pre-cut foam insert for the liquid cooling unit and extra power supply—and bag do make carrying the whole setup around that much easier, should you want to lug it around to a friend’s house or, if you’re seriously committed to gaming, on holiday. Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Researchers encode a movie onto living bacteria

Posted by kenmay on July - 13 - 2017

Forget USB drives and the cloud — what if you could carry every bit of data you’ve ever used on your skin? That’s the long-term goal of researchers at Harvard Medical School, who have stored a video in the DNA of bacteria. It’s the first time a video has been recorded into living cells, as opposed to synthetic material. The team inserted a short animated image of ‘The Horse in Motion’ (one of the earliest moving images ever created) into E. coli, using gene-editing system CRISPR. The movie was split into five frames, and each frame chopped into single-colored pixels. They then created DNA codes corresponding to each color and strung them together. Each bacterium carried snippets of the video stored in their DNA, and when taken together, the scientists were able to retrieve and reconstruct the pieces to play the video. It’s not the first time we’ve seen data stored in this fashion. Back in 2003 a small message was encoded into DNA, and more recently we’ve seen a full operating system written into DNA strands. One team is even trying to store poetry in DNA. But this is the first time it’s been attempted with living bacteria, rather than synthetic material, which presents a unique set of challenges. Live cells are constantly moving and changing, and are liable to interpret the addition of data to their DNA as an invading virus, and subsequently destroy it. That’s why, shaky and blurred as it is, this movie breaks new ground. The world is generating huge amounts of digital data, and scientists see DNA as an effective way of not only dealing with the volumes produced, but as a secure method of preservation. In the face of nuclear explosions, radiation exposure or extreme temperature fluctuation some bacteria can continue to exist — data centers will not. It’ll be some time before you can use this technology to upload data into your body, but in the meantime it has valuable research applications. The scientists behind the study hope the breakthrough will eventually lead to the creation of “living sensors” that can record what is happening inside a cell or in its environment. Via: Stat News Source: Nature (PDF)

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