Tech Today w/ Ken May

Archive for February 13th, 2017

Enlarge Intel’s eighth-generation Core CPUs, codenamed Coffee Lake, will launch in the second half of 2017—far earlier than the 2018 launch period suggested by supposed product roadmaps leaked last year. At its Investor Day event last week, Intel confirmed that its 8th-gen chips will once again be based on a 14nm process, much like Broadwell , Skylake , and Kaby Lake  before it. The first Broadwell chips were released way back in 2014. Intel officially  abandoned its previous “Tick-Tock” strategy—with each “tick” representing a die shrink and each “tock” representing a new microarchitecture—in early 2016, and instead promised a three-phase model of Process, Architecture, Optimization. But now, with Coffee Lake, it seems Intel might have abandoned that new model, too. Technically, Kaby Lake is the “Optimization” to the “Architecture” of Skylake and the “Process” of Broadwell, which makes the early launch of Coffee Lake on 14nm something of an anomaly. Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Encrypted Email Is Still a Pain in 2017

Posted by kenmay on February - 13 - 2017

Bristol-based software developer James Stanley, who used to work at Netcraft, shares how encrypted emails, something which was first introduced over 25 years ago, is still difficult to setup and use for even reasonably tech savvy people. He says he recently tried to install Enigmail, a Thunderbird add-on, but not only things like GPG, PGP, OpenPGP were — for no reason — confusing, Enigmail continues to suffer from a bug that takes forever in generating keys. From his blog post: Encrypted email is nothing new (PGP was initially released in 1991 — 26 years ago!), but it still has a huge barrier to entry for anyone who isn’t already familiar with how to use it. I think my experience would have been better if Enigmail had generated keys out-of-the-box, or if (a.) gpg agreed with Enigmail on nomenclature (is it a secring or a private key?) and (b.) output the paths of the files it had generated. My experience would have been a lot worse had I not been able to call on the help of somebody who already knows how to use it. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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